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Speakers – 2014 Central Valley Symposium on Basic and Clinical Sciences:

 

Inaugural Address

David Hawkins

David Hawkins, PharmD

Provost and Dean of Pharmacy, California Health Sciences University

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California Health Sciences University College of Pharmacy offers an innovative doctor of pharmacy curriculum and a broad-based research agenda in the pharmaceutical, biomedical, and clinical sciences. The curriculum is built on a team-based learning frame that is designed to engage students in active learning, critical thinking, and problem-solving. The research program focuses on developing and evaluating novel drug formulations, neuro and cardiovascular pharmacology, clinical translational experiments, health care outcomes, and clinical practice interventions. Our faculty are also setting up interprofessional educational activities with other health professional students in the area and collaborative research projects with faculty at Fresno State University.

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Chief Guest Address

Flo Dunn

Flo T. Dunn

President, California Health Sciences University

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California Health Sciences University was founded to provide our future health care professionals with a unique opportunity — the opportunity to practice in the forefront of their fields and to make a significant impact in the state’s fastest-growing region. The healthcare needs of Central California are great. Our hope is that our graduates will develop a deep-rooted connection to our community and learn to deliver evidence-based, compassionate care and enhance the quality of life for our incredibly diverse population.

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Special Invited Guest Address

Lynne Ashbeck

Mayor Lynne Ashbeck, MA, MS, RD

Mayor, City of Clovis; Regional Vice President, Hospital Council of Northern and Central California

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The City of Clovis has many unique assets and distinctions that set us apart from other communities in the Valley but perhaps none so clear as our commitment to education. From our outstanding public school system to the launch of the California Health Sciences University College of Pharmacy, Clovis is committed to supporting the highest-quality education, innovation, and technology in the region. We are honored to be ‘home’ to the launch of this outstanding university and look forward to supporting your efforts in any way we can.

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Keynote Speaker I

Michael W. Peterson, MD

Michael W. Peterson, MD

Valley Medical Foundation Professor of Medicine and Chief of Medicine, University of California San Francisco Fresno Medical Education Program, Vice-Chair of Medicine, UCSF

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Title: Outcomes and Lessons Learned from a Multidisciplinary Lung Nodule Program in an Endemic Area for Coccidioidomycosis
Abstract: Lung nodules are common findings on chest CT scans and will become more common if lung cancer screening with low dose CT scanning is adopted. Recognizing lung cancers at an early stage improves survival, and delays in referral and diagnosis result in increased mortality. Only a small fraction of lung nodules found on CT scanning are cancers, but distinguishing these malignant lesions from benign lesions is challenging for clinicians. This challenge is heightened in areas with endemic mycosis such as Coccidioidomycosis which can present in the lung as nodules that are indistinguishable from lung cancer. To help address this we established a Multidisciplinary Lung Nodule Clinic in 2009. We have seen more than 2000 patients over those five years. The clinic has reduced the time from abnormal CT scan to diagnosis from 87 days to seven days with a significant increase in early stage cancer diagnoses. In addition we have developed a database of patient information that has allowed us to measure the clinical performance of laboratory tests, pathology, radiological appearance and clinical risk factors in distinguishing Coccidioidomycosis nodules from early lung cancer. This patient population is now available for further testing of newer diagnostic modalities for both Coccidioidomycosis and lung cancer and in testing treatment paradigms for Coccidioidomycosis. In addition, by establishing a tissue bank for these patients, we will provide a resource for multiple investigators to rapidly test hypotheses for diagnosis and treatment of these two diseases.
Biography: Michael W. Peterson is the Valley Medical Foundation Professor of Medicine and Chief of Medicine, UCSF Fresno Medical Education Program and Vice-Chair of Medicine, UCSF. He currently practices as a pulmonologist and critical care specialist at CRMC in Fresno. He graduated from the University of Minnesota Medical School. He completed his residency and chief residency in Internal Medicine at the University of Wisconsin and his fellowship in pulmonary and critical care medicine at the University of Iowa before joining the faculty at the University of Iowa. In 2002 he moved to Fresno to assume his current role in the UCSF training program in Fresno.

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Keynote Speaker II

Lakshmaiah Sreerama, PHD

Lakshmaiah Sreerama, PHD

Professor, Dept of Chemistry and Earth Sciences, Qatar University, Qatar and St Cloud State University, St Cloud, MN, USA

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Title: Ottelione A: A Natural Product with Potent Anticancer Activity, Mode of Action and Molecular Basis for Resistance
Abstract: Ottelione A, a natural product isolated from Ottelia alismoides, exhibits potent antitumor activity (LC50 values 25-60 nM) against a panel of breast tumor cell lines. Its antitumor activity is believed to be due to the inhibition of microtubule assembly during mitosis and thus commit cells to apoptosis. Our studies show that any structural modifications to Ottelione A will result in significant loss of antitumor activity against the panel of breast tumor cells tested. A human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF 7/OttA) resistant to ottelione A, is also resistant to Ottelione A structural analogues as well as other microtubule assembly inhibitors/destabilizing agents. Molecular analysis of MCF-7/OttA cells suggests the resistance is due to multi-factorial changes in the resistant cells. Over-expression of ABCG2 (a member of multi-drug resistance family protein) and mislocalization of mitotic arrest deficiency proteins, e.g., MAD1 and MAD2, partly account for resistance to Ottelione A. Microarray analysis of parent (MCF-7/0) and Ottelione A resistant MCF-7/OttA cell lines performed using a human cancer and drug metabolism gene array shows significant differences in gene expression patterns.
Biography: Dr. Sreerama received his Ph.D. (Chemistry/Biochemistry) from Bangalore University, Bangalore, India and postdoctoral training at University of Minnesota. He has been a faculty member at University of Minnesota and St Cloud State University, MN USA. He also served as the toxicologist for the State of Minnesota. He is currently Professor of Biochemistry at Dept of Chemistry and Earth Sciences, College of Arts and Science, Qatar University and is on leave from Department of Chemistry, St Cloud State University, St Cloud, MN 56301, USA.

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Keynote Speaker III

Lynne Ashbeck, MA, MS, RD

Lynne Ashbeck, MA, MS, RD

Regional Vice President
Hospital Council of Northern and Central California

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Title: Population Health: The Only Thing Certain Is That It Will Take All of Us to Achieve!
Abstract: According to a recent report from the American Hospital Association, “population health [is] a must-do strategy for hospitals and health systems to succeed in the evolving healthcare environment.” Attention to population health is not a new emphasis for hospitals but, driven in large measure by the Affordable Care Act, it clearly represents a shift in the long-held business models of acute care hospitals that have been based on in-patient volume, patient encounters, and length-of-stay measures, as examples. Hospitals are engaged in many initiatives that support broader population health goals, including care transitions, readmissions, chronic care disease management clinics/services and quality and patient safety. Just how those initiatives develop and impact the health of our community is yet to be fully known but one thing is certain: it will take a partnership between hospitals, healthcare providers, universities and all engaged in our community healthcare system to affect real change. This session will explore population health, current initiatives, and new opportunities to collaborate, measure and impact the health of those we all serve and who call the Valley ‘home.’
Biography: Lynne Ashbeck is the Regional Vice President for the Hospital Council of Northern and Central California, working with every hospital in the eight Central California/ Central Coast counties on projects driven by the shared interests of all hospitals, including community benefits, workforce, mental health, homeless health care, emergency medical services, care transitions, “safe prescribing” initiatives, and other local issues.
Lynne completed both her Bachelor’s Degree and Master’s Degree at Fresno State (1977) and is a Registered Dietitian. She completed a Master’s degree in Conflict Resolution and Peacemaking from Fresno Pacific University in May 2012 and is a trained mediator.
She is currently the Mayor of the City of Clovis and has served on the Clovis City Council since 2001.

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Session 1 – Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Ahmmed-Ally, MD, PhD

Ahmmed Ally, MD, PhD

Professor of Pharmacology, CHSU College of Pharmacy

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Title: Drug Delivery by Microdialysis
Biography: Ahmmed Ally, Professor at California Health Sciences University received his M.D. degree and a Ph.D. from Chiba University School of Medicine, Japan in 1992. Dr. Ally contributes to Physiology and Immunology textbooks, has 70 publications, and over 100 presentations in national/international conferences. He received awards/grants from NIH and American Heart Association. He is in study section of American Heart Association and Alzheimer’s Foundation, editorial board of Journal of Pharmacology and reviewer of numerous journals. Dr. Ally’s research focuses on identifying molecular/neurochemical mechanisms within the brain that regulate cardiovascular system during static exercise and whether they are impaired following stroke.

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Session 1 – Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Qiao-Hong Chen, PhD

Qiao-Hong Chen, PhD

Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry, California State University, Fresno

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Title: Anti-cancer Agents Inspired by Dietary Curcumin
Abstract: Prostate cancer has the highest incidence and the second highest cancer mortality in American men. Approximately 30,000 men die each year of hormone-refractory prostate cancer, which becomes refractory by the inevitable progression of resistance to first-line treatment with docetaxel. Dietary curcumin has a high safety profile in humans and has been demonstrated to have anti-cancer potential in several culture cell systems and human xenograft mouse models, in particular against hormone-refractory prostate cancer. However, the clinical advancement of curcumin has been hindered by its low bioavailability due to poor water solubility and rapid in vivo metabolism.
Our curcumin project aims to engineer drug-like curcumin analogs with improved bioavailability and enhanced potency towards hormone refractory prostate cancer. Four scaffolds of heteroaromatic curcumin analogs (over sixty analogues in total) have been designed and synthesized. Their cytotoxicity against two hormone-independent prostate cancer cell lines, as well as three other aggressive cancer cell lines, was evaluated. More than 90% of these analogues are more cytotoxic than parental curcumin towards these aggressive human cancer cell lines in trypan blue dye exclusion assay. The design, syntheses, cytotoxic data, and structure-activity relationships will be presented.
Biography: Qiao-Hong Chen received her Ph.D. degree from Sichuan University, China. Appointed as a Lecturer in 2001, she was promoted to the position of Full Professor in 2003 at Sichuan University. She was a Postdoctoral Fellow for three years at the University of Alberta in Canada and a Senior Research Fellow for six years at Virginia Tech. She has been at Fresno State as an Assistant Professor of Chemistry since 2012 and is a recipient of 2013/2014 Provost’s Award for Promising New Faculty. Her research interests focus on natural products-based anticancer agents. She has published over 100 peer-reviewed scientific publications.

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Session 1 – Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences

M. Delwar Hussain, MPharm, PhD

M. Delwar Hussain, MPharm, PhD

Professor of Pharmaceutics, CHSU College of Pharmacy

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Title: Cancer Nanomedicine: Novel Nanoparticles for Advanced Cancer Therapy
Abstract: Nanotechnology is providing new tools in cancer therapy resulting in several products on the market. Advantages of Nanoparticles (NPs) for cancer therapy include improved solubility and stability, sustained release, increased accumulation in cancer cells, decreased side effects, combination therapy for synergistic effect or reversal of multi-drug resistance, and theranostic use. Our objective is to design nanoparticle system which can deliver anticancer drugs specifically to metastatic and resistant cancer cells in sufficient concentration and avoid side-effects. We have developed few NPs systems in our laboratory such as targeted polymeric NPs, efflux-pump inhibiting micelles and platelet-shaped zirconium phosphate (ZrP) NPs. The biodegradable polymeric targeted NPs were used to deliver 17-allylamino-17-demethoxy geldanamycin (17-AAG), an inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90). The polymeric micelles were used for delivery of poorly water soluble anticancer natural products such as gambogic acid, curcumin and other agents. Release of these agents were sustained as a result of encapsulation into the NPs. The NPs had increased uptake and in vitro cytotoxicity in multidrug-resistant ovarian and other cancer cell lines. The drug loaded NPs have signi?cantly enhanced tumor inhibition effect in animal model of multidrug resistant cancer over untreated control and drug treated groups. The ZrP NPs are capable of intercalating high load (35% w/w) of the model anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX) into their layered structures. DOX loaded ZrP NPs showed higher cellular uptake and increased cytotoxicity in sensitive and metastatic breast cancer cells. These multifunctional nanoparticle systems can be developed for nano drug delivery in advanced cancer therapy.
Biography: Muhammad Delwar Hussain is Professor of Pharmaceutics, California Health Sciences University. He received his Ph.D. from University of Alberta, Canada. Dr. Hussain’s research focuses on drug delivery, nanomedicine, pharmacokinetics and cancer therapeutics. He has more than 100 publications, and several federal, foundation and industrial grants. His work in pharmaceutical industries led to marketed products such as Eligard® for prostate cancer. He is associate editor and editorial board member of several journals. He served United States Pharmacopeia (USP) as expert committee member. He is currently the Chair-elect of Pharmaceutics Section, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP).

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Session 1 – Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Santanu Maitra, PhD

Santanu Maitra, PhD

Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry, California State University, Fresno

Email: smaitra@csufresno.edu

Title: Organic Molecules in Coronary Artery & Alzheimer’s Disease
Abstract: Small organic compounds constitute a majority of FDA approved drugs to combat a plethora of human illnesses. The highly creative, high-risk, and time-consuming drug development process involves a massive collaborative effort between various disciplines of science. This presentation will focus on two such journeys in two different therapeutic areas: coronary artery disease and Alzheimer’s disease. The first part of the talk will be on coronary artery disease that can be caused by the build-up of mass in arteries rich in LDL. The phenomenon is called ‘atherosclerosis’ and leads to the constriction of the arteries. The research team at Dr. Reddy’s Lab attempted to develop therapy by up-regulating HDL – the good cholesterol with small organic molecules. Several lead molecules were identified and the most promising compound received FDA approval for human clinical trials for further development. The second half of the presentation will focus on the current endeavor in developing small molecule drugs for Alzheimer’s disease. A carrier protein, apolipoprotein E (apoE) has been implicated to be closely involved in the complex mechanism of Alzheimer’s disease. Out of the three forms: apoE2, apoE3, and apoE4, apoE4 has been unanimously stamped as the ‘bad protein’ playing a major role in the onset of the disease. Research at Fresno State has identified two classes of small organic molecules that modulate the production of apoE in brain cells. Development of more efficacious molecules with ‘drug-like’ properties is underway. The research offers the promise to contribute to Alzheimer’s therapy in the future.
Biography: Santanu Maitra obtained his Ph.D. degree in Synthetic Organic Chemistry from Prof. David Lightner’s research laboratory in University of Nevada Reno. He pursued a postdoctoral stint in the area of Bioorganic Chemistry in the research laboratory of Prof. James Nowick at University of California Irvine. He spent the next 8+ years in pharmaceutical industry – first in Albany Molecular Research in Albany, NY followed by Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories in Hyderabad, India. He joined the faculty in the Department of Chemistry at California State University Fresno in the Fall of 2008.

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Session 1 – Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Chandra Kolli, PhD

Chandra Kolli, PhD

Associate Professor of Pharmaceutics, CHSU College of Pharmacy

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Title: Microneedle Mediated Transdermal Delivery of Drugs
Abstract: Microneedles are tiny micron sized structures that disrupts the stratum corneum for enhancing skin permeation of drugs. The utility of microneedles (from Dermaroller™) in increasing in vitro skin permeation of drugs was investigated. Microneedles when used either alone or in combination with iontophoresis, enhanced the transdermal flux of drugs. Dermaroller™ created microchannels that were visualized using methylene blue staining and scanning electron microscopy. Localized disruption of the stratum corneum was confirmed by Transepidermal water loss measurements. In vitro skin permeation studies were performed using vertical static Franz diffusion cells. Iontophoretic protocols involved application of direct current at a density of 0.1-0.5 mA/cm2 using Ag as an anode and Ag/AgCl as a cathode. The effect of drug concentration, number of passes of microneedles (0, 5, 10 and 20) on both iontophoretic and passive delivery was investigated. The effect of lipophilicity of drug on the microneedle mediated transdermal iontophoretic delivery was also investigated.  The DermarollerTM was found to successfully breach the skin barrier and a linear relationship (r2 = 0.99) was observed between the number of passes of the Dermaroller™ and the number of microchannels created. The transdermal flux increased following pretreatment with microneedle (used alone or in conjunction with iontophoresis). Depending on the physicochemical properties of the drug, there was a statistically significant increase in transdermal flux as compared to passive delivery. 
Biography:: Chandra Sekhar Kolli obtained his Bachelor’s, Master’s and PhD degree in Pharmacy from Kakatiya University (India) followed by a Post-Doctoral training from Mercer University (GA, USA). He is currently working as Associate Professor of Pharmaceutics at California Health Sciences University (CA, USA). His research interests include transdermal drug delivery using active enhancement strategies and transmucosal drug delivery. He authored and co-authored publications and presentations related to drug delivery. He is also serving as a sub-chair for scientific abstract screening committee in AAPS, Associate editor for two journals and reviewer for several peer reviewed scientific journals.

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Session 2 – Advances in Biomedical Sciences

Cory L. Brooks, PhD

Cory L. Brooks, PhD

Assistant Professor of Biochemistry, California State University, Fresno

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Title: Exploiting the Camel Immune System for the Prevention of Listeriosis
Abstract: There exists a critical need for new strategies to combat the potentially fatal food borne disease Listeriosis. Tragically, the bacteria can cross the fetal-maternal barrier during pregnancy triggering miscarriages even in asymptomatic cases. Given the danger posed by Listeriosis during pregnancy, the development of a prophylactic that can prevent bacterial invasion would be welcome addition to prenatal care regimens. The causative agent of Listeriosis, Listeria monocytogenes mobilizes protein virulence factors called internalins to bind host cell receptors, activating receptor mediated endocytosis facilitating invasion of epithelial cells. This first phase in the infective process is essential for pathogenesis, and represents an attractive step for therapeutic intervention. To inhibit the interaction of Listeria Internalin B (InlB) with the host cell receptor c-met, we are exploiting the unique antibodies derived from the Camel immune system. Typical antibody binding sites are formed by pairing two protein chains (heavy and light chain), Camels have evolved to produce an antibody devoid of a light chain. The single domain antibodies (sdAb) produced by Camels have many beneficial properties including high stability, ease of recombinant production and can bind epitopes inaccessible to traditional antibodies. We have generated a panel of sdAb that bind Listeria Internalin B. Using X-ray crystallography we have mapped the nature of the molecular nature of this interaction and demonstrate that these sdAb can inhibit Listeria invasion in vitro. Our results highlight a novel approach for combating Listeriosis.
Biography: Cory L Brooks is an Assistant Professor of Biochemistry, at California State University Fresno. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Victoria, Canada. And conducted his post-doctoral work at the University of Alberta, Canada. Dr. Brooks is interested in using X-ray crystallography and protein engineering to better understand how antibodies interact with their targets. Dr. Brooks’ lab is exploring the ability of single domain antibodies (nanobodies) to neutralize the food pathogen Listeria, and engineering therapeutic antibodies to bind the cancer associated protein MUC1.

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Session 2 – Advances in Biomedical Sciences

John Martin, PhD

John Martin, PhD

Professor of Pharmacology, CHSU College of Pharmacy

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Title: Studies on the Posterior Hypothalamic Nucleus: Cardiovascular System Effects
Abstract: The posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PHN) of the rat is known to contain acetylcholine (ACh) in nerves that originate in the anterior hypothalamic/preoptic area (AH/PO) and cannabinoid subtype 1 receptors (CB1). Microinjection of carbachol (CCh), a cholinergic receptor agonist, into the rat PHN increases blood pressure (BP) accompanied by a biphasic change in heart rate (HR), which initially increases due to sympathoexcitation and then decreases due to increased vagal tone and circulating AVP. The increase in AVP occurs at the highest dose of CCh, which coincides with the ability of CCh in the PHN to increase baroreceptor reflex (BR) sensitivity. Blockade of systemic AVP V1-receptors returns BR sensitivity to normal. In addition, blockade of muscarinic receptors in the PHN decreases the rate of recovery of blood pressure towards normal after rapid blood loss (i.e. hemorrhage). These findings suggest that activation of cholinergic pathways in the PHN may occur during specific cardiovascular events. Stimulation of a serotonergic pathway from the AH/PO to the PHN by DOI evokes an increase in BP and HR while muscarinic receptor blockade in the PHN prevents these increases. Stimulation of the CB1 receptor in the PHN attenuates these changes. These changes are reversed by PHN presence of a CB1 antagonist and a non-specific CB agonist. Interestingly, a non-specific CB agonist, a CB2 antagonist, or the combination of the CB2 antagonist and the CB1 agonist revealed a biphasic DOI-evoked pressor response. These results suggest the possibility that release of ACh in the PHN may be modified by CB1 and additional CB receptor subtypes.
Biography: Dr. Martin is Professor and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Assessment at California Health Sciences University College of Pharmacy. He is interested in the regulation of the cardiovascular system by the posterior hypothalamic nucleus, the neurotransmitters of this region and the connections of this nucleus with other brain regions. Research has included determining the role and relationships between acetylcholine, neuropeptide Y, cannabinoids and serotonin in the hypothalamus. These studies increase our understanding of mechanisms of action of neurotransmitters and their involvement in regulating the cardiovascular system. He has been awarded AHA and NIH AREA grants to fund his research.

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Session 2 – Advances in Biomedical Sciences

Sudhakar Yakkanti, MSc, MPhil & PhD

Sudhakar Yakkanti, MSc, MPhil & PhD

Associate Director: Center for Cancer & Metabolism, Cell Signaling Laboratory, Bioscience Division, SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park, California 94025-3493

Email:

Title: Regulation of Tumor Metastasis by Endogenous Metabolite
Abstract: Metastasis is frequently deadlier than the original tumor-ultimately, reducing the risk or occurrence of metastasis could effectively cure or at least manage human cancer. My laboratory has carried out research that could significantly contribute to the control of malignant progression, involving the use of endogenous metabolite that is released from the extracellular matrix, which is both an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor and anti-metastatic molecule. The signaling mechanism(s) underlying the influence of this metabolite on regulation of tumor angiogenesis and tumor metastasis are not yet known. We identified that this metabolite binds to different cell surface integrins, inhibits different cellular signaling in a manner distinct from that of other extra cellular matrix derived metabolites studied to date. Treatment of endothelial cells with this metabolite specifically inhibiting ?-elastin mediated phosphorylation of FAK, Akt, mTOR and PI-3K signaling. In addition different in-vitro and in-vivo studies, we found that this metabolite possibly binding to Laminin D-III and D-IV domains and inhibits Laminin degradation by the matrix metalloprotease-14 (MMP-14), and thereby reduces the generation of different sized peptides that can bind to the EGF receptor and promote cancer metastasis, in addition to its integrin(s) mediated signaling. Our findings suggest that this metabolite interacting with different cell surface integrins and cross talking with other receptors or other extracellular matrix molecules and inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and tumor metastasis both in-vitro and in-vivo.
Biography: Sudhakar Yakkanti, Associate Director/Senior Scientist at Center for Cancer & Metabolism, Bioscience Division, SRI International, California. He did his postdoctoral training at Harvard Medical, Boston USA. He received Indian President’s fellowships, YCS, Michael A. O’Connor Young Investigator Awards from FAMRI and Mayo Clinic. He has more than 40 publications including Science, JCI, Blood, PNAS etc. His research focuses on cell signaling and tumor metastasis, which is supported by federal and foundation grants. He was served as grant reviewer for DT study section. He is serving as an Editor-in-Chief and also honored as keynote speaker and session chair for many conferences.

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Session 2 – Advances in Biomedical Sciences

Kalyan Munshi, MSc, PhD

Kalyan Munshi, MSc, PhD

Assistant Professor of Medicinal Chemistry, CHSU College of Pharmacy

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Title: Polymeric Antiviral Drug Design: Novel Adamantanoids-based Polymeric Therapeutics
Abstract: R&D in Pharmaceutical Chemistry revealed remarkable Biological Activity of Adamantanoids, and identified them as a new class of potential antiviral agents. For instance, Amantadine and Rimantadine are well known anti-influenza drugs. However, wide use of adamantanoid drugs in clinical practice is quite limited due to their high toxicity, immune-depressant nature and susceptibility for the quick growth of viral drug resistance. To overcome the said drawbacks, and to impart a broad spectrum of antiviral and immunological properties, we put forwarded a Novel Macromolecular Approach for Polymeric Antiviral Drug Design. Based on desired macromolecular design, several polymeric drugs (PD) have been synthesized from bioactive maleic anhydride copolymers and adamantanoid fragments with specific spacer groups of different length and conformational mobility. By optimizing molecular weight and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance, several PD having low toxicity and high antiviral activity on different virus models have been obtained. The antiviral activity of the PD was studied in vitro against different Influenza strains & HIV-1 replication. The cytotoxicity level to MDCK cells was also determined. The newly designed Adamantanoid Anti-Influenza/Anti-HIV Preparations showed a bright perspective of Polymeric Drug Design. Obtained results revealed 1.2 orders less toxicity & high antiviral efficacy against both Influenza virus – A & B. Moreover, the synthesized PD exhibited ~100% inhibition against HIV-1 replication. The effects of the synthesized PD on ionic channels and ionic pumps of frog skin epithelial cells were investigated. In correlation with the bioelectric characteristics of epithelial cell membranes, the mechanism of polymeric drug action has been suggested.
Biography: Kalyan Munshi received his PhD in Chemistry from Russian Academy of Sciences, and MS in Chemical Engineering from Gubkin State University, Moscow. Prior to joining CHSU, he has been a faculty member at Texas A&M University, St Cloud State University, University of Minnesota, and Russian State University, Moscow. His research interests focused on a) Strategic Design & Syntheses of Antiviral/Antibacterial Therapeutic Agents from Triterpenoid-based Natural Products; b) Polymeric Drug Design & Macromolecular Architecture for Novel Biomaterials c) Design & Creation of Bioactive Polymer Matrix incorporated Novel Drug Delivery System. He has numerous awards, patents, publications, and presentations in international conferences.

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Session 3 – Advances in Population Health

Robert Clegg, PhD, MPH, MCHES

Robert Clegg, PhD, MPH, MCHES

Associate Professor of Administrative Sciences, CHSU College of Pharmacy

Email:

Title: Does evidence-based practice influence patient safety? A retrospective analysis of SB 1301 in Central California
Abstract: Over the past two decades, the healthcare system in the United States has been unsettled by research highlighting a number of problems that hinder the delivery of quality medical care. While these findings have resulted in an increase in the medical malpractice litigation to crisis levels in many states, they have also spurred the development of the patient safety movement throughout the nation. With the passing of Senate Bill 1301 in California, acute care hospitals are mandated to report the occurrence of any adverse event to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH). According to SB 1301, any acute care hospital in California that is cited for violating the “Never Events,” including surgery performed on the wrong patient/body part, objects left inside patients after surgery, and death/serious disability resulting from a medication error, can be monetarily penalized up to $50,000 per incident. While research has found no statistical significance between the number of visits, citations and monetary fines administered by the CDPH for SB 1301 reportable events among Central California acute care hospitals that possess evidence-based patient safety programs and those facilities that do not have such programs in place, the results concluded that by placing less consequence on individual blame that is punitive in nature and more focus on incorporating a “just culture” – one that highlights system failures as opposed to individual acts of negligence – emphasis can be placed on implementing proactive changes within the healthcare delivery system to minimize risk and improve the overall quality of patient care.
Biography: Robert Clegg is an Associate Professor of Administrative Sciences at California Health Sciences University in Clovis, CA. He received his PhD in Health Care Administration from Capella University in Minneapolis, MN, and a Master of Public Health from California State University, Fresno. Dr. Clegg is a Master Certified Health Education Specialist (MCHES) through the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc., and has served on the Board of Directors for a number of regional and statewide professional and philanthropic organizations, including the American Red Cross – Central Valley Chapter and California Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (CAHPERD).

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Session 3 – Advances in Population Health

Jaymin Kwon, PhD, REHS

Jaymin Kwon, PhD, REHS

Assistant Professor of Public Health, California State University, Fresno

Email:

Title: Comparison of Personal Exposure of Bicyclists to PM2.5, Black Carbon (BC), and Ultrafine Particles in Indoor and Outdoor Air in Fresno, California
Abstract: Ambient air quality in Fresno California has been an important environmental issue impacting public health for decades. People who stay outside for recreational activity such as bicyclists are exposed to outdoor pollution. In March 2014, the personal exposures to multiple air pollutants in Fresno were measured while young male adult participants riding stationary bikes in indoor and outdoor locations. PM2.5, ultrafine particles, and black carbon concentrations were measured using the real-time monitors. Personal exposures were measured inside of the South Gym on campus of California State University Fresno and outside of the California State University Fresno Foundation near highway 168 for comparison. PM2.5 concentrations were measured using Dust Trak DRX 8533 and 8534. Using CPC 3007, personal exposures to ultrafine particles were measured. MicroAeth AE51 collected the black carbon concentration. Temperature and humidity were recorded using sensors. The time-location data for each bicyclist was recorded hard copy. It is a within-group experimental design in which all subjects participate in the inside and outside stationary cycling. The heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, pulmonary function testing via a spirometer were measured at baseline, during the test, post-test, and 4 hours after for each condition. Subjects cycled within an hour period under the same cycling protocol with cardiopulmonary and air pollution measurements throughout testing. PM2.5 and ultrafine particle concentrations were significantly higher in outdoor air compared to levels measured in indoor air. Ultrafine particle concentrations were influenced immediately when wind was blown from smoke stack of the broiler restaurant nearby. The personal exposure to air pollution levels by location and time are being analyzed and will be compared.
Biography: Dr. Kwon is an assistant professor of Environmental Health of the Department of Public Health in California State University, Fresno. Dr. Kwon obtained his Ph.D. degree in Exposure Sciences from the joint program of Rutgers University and the University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey – Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. He assessed the influence of proximity to the emission sources on the ambient air concentrations of gas and particle phase air pollutants around the studied homes. He has been doing research on the personal exposure to air pollutants using GIS mapping and proximity modeling, real-time sample collection and time location measurements in New Jersey, Houston Texas, and Los Angeles and Fresno California. He is a collaborating investigator of EPA/NIEHS UC Berkley/Stanford Children’s Center, Children’s Health and Air Pollution Study in San Joaquin Valley (CHAPS-SJV). The study focuses on air pollution and birth outcome, children’s asthma, diabetes and obesity.

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Session 3 – Advances in Population Health

Jared Rutledge, Ph. D

Jared Rutledge, PhD

Epidemiologist, Fresno County Public Health Department, Fresno, CA

Email:

Title: Advances in Public Health: Innovations in the local health jurisdiction
Abstract: Historically, public health departments have collected a variety of data on communicable diseases, cancers, syndromic surveillance, tobacco use, and other population relevant information. The local health jurisdictions have not traditionally been able to use these data to guide interventions. Often this is due to the limitations of grant funding or a lack of trained staff able to conduct rigorous scientific investigations. Fresno County Department of Public Health (FCDPH) is now starting to partner with University California San Francisco (UCSF), California State University, Fresno (CSUF), and other regional health jurisdictions to produce research on the health of the residents in the Central Valley. Recently, FCDPH partnered with UCSF to evaluate the persistence of Kaposi’s Sarcoma in Fresno County. Future collaborations will focus on Valley Fever projects with University of California Merced (UCM) and UCSF. The goal of these collaborations is to continue to show where the health disparities exist in Fresno County to guide the appropriate targeting regions within the Central Valley for the purpose of using data to drive the application of evidence based public health interventions. FCDPH is now using Geographic Information Systems along with predictive mathematical models to show the impact of these public health issues on the health care infrastructure of the Central Valley. FCDPH is using the data to assist with driving health policy in Fresno County. Fresno County regularly is one of the poorest health jurisdictions in the nation. It is through these new techniques that we will be able to more effectively use our resources.
Biography: Jared Rutledge is an epidemiologist for Fresno County Public Health Department. He has his PhD in Public Health with emphasis in Epidemiology. While Jared Rutledge was trained in multiple sub-disciplines in epidemiology he favors communicable diseases. His current research has focused on Hepatitis C in incarcerated populations and HIV/AIDS in Fresno County. Jared is currently engaging in population based research with Gilead Pharmaceuticals as well as various academic and private institutions Jared specializes in analysis of secondary data analysis and building of predictive epidemiological models.

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Session 3 – Advances in Population Health

Lauren Lessard, MPH PhD Candidate

Lauren Lessard, MPH, PhD Candidate

California State University, Fresno, Central Valley Health Policy Institute (Post-graduate Research Fellow)
University of California, Los Angeles

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Title: Place and Health: Preventable Hospitalizations for Children in the San Joaquin Valley of California.
Abstract: Background – Health inequalities are the most striking feature of population health in the Central Valley and are linked to social and environmental factors unique to the region. In this study, pediatric preventable disease hospitalization rates indicate the burden of disease on children, their families and the community that disproportionately affect the Central Valley.
Methods – Hospitalization rates for 8 Central Valley counties were obtained from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development. Census Data provided zip-code level factors including racial composition, distance from hospital and poverty rates. The California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) pollution burden score was calculated using 11 indicators for pollution. OLS and negative binomial regression for preventable pediatric conditions were calculated and mapped to illustrate the variance in hospitalization rates by zip code across the Central Valley.
Results – Zip codes with high concentrations of families in poverty are associated with a 57% increase in preventable disease hospitalizations for children 15 and under. As pollution burden increases by 10%, hospitalizations rates increase by 11% and 16% in age groups 0-5 and 5-14, respectively. The interaction between pollution and poverty is a significant predictor of preventable admissions in the 0-5 age group. Maps depict strong correlations between hospitalizations and high rates of poverty, racial diversity and pollution. Results are significant at p-value <= .05.
Conclusions – Understanding the geographic distribution of disease and impact of community level factors is essential to expanding access to preventive resources to improve the health of children in the Central Valley.
Biography: Lauren N. Lessard is a post-graduate research fellow with the Central Valley Health Policy Institute. Her research investigates health disparities within the Central Valley’s underserved populations, particularly among women and children. Lauren is concurrently a PhD candidate in the Department of Community Health Sciences, Fielding School of Public Health at UCLA with an expected completion date of September 2014. Lauren received her MPH from UC Berkeley in Maternal and Child Health. Prior to completing her MPH, Lauren was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Suriname, South America and completed her BA in Political Science at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

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Session 3 – Advances in Population Health

Mohammad A Rahman, Ph.D.

Mohammad A Rahman, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Public Health, California State University, Fresno

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Title: Can More Use of Supporting Primary Care Health Practitioners Increase Efficiency of Health Clinics? Evidence from California’s San Joaquin Valley
Abstract: This study examined 67 primary healthcare centers operating in the San Joaquin Valley, California and explored the factors that may have contributed to productive efficiency gains. The study used Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) technique to measure efficiency of the clinics and then used Tobit regression analysis to understand the factors that affected efficiency. It was found that clinics that employed relatively more ‘unlicensed’ supporting practitioners compared to ‘licensed’ practitioners were more likely to be efficient. The results also showed that clinics that employed fewer physicians compared to all ‘licensed’ practitioners were likely to be more efficient. In addition, providing transportation services to patients also enhanced clinics’ efficiency.
Biography: Mohammad Rahman, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor, at the Department of Public Health in California State University, Fresno where he teaches Public Health Administration, Human Resource Management in Health care and the Economics of Health care. His research interests are in the areas of efficiency analysis of healthcare organizations, telemedicine and e-health.

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Session 4 – Advances in Primary Care

Tony Joseph Eid, PharmD, REHS

Tony Joseph Eid, PharmD, REHS

Assistant Professor of Clinical Sciences, CHSU College of Pharmacy

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Title: Improving pharmacotherapy in patients with hyperlipidemia focus on novel agents.
Abstract: HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are recommended as the first-line of drug therapy to meet low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol goals when lifestyle modifications are not effective and are therefore used ubiquitously in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Adherence to medications for the prevention of asymptomatic chronic diseases in real-world practice settings is known to be suboptimal. Review of past trials demonstrated that musculoskeletal pain and cost account for the vast majority of statin discontinuance as demonstrated by both the PRIMO and USAGE trials respectively. Results of these trials demonstrated that 10-20 % of statin users discontinued therapy secondary to myalgia like symptoms while results from most other studies of statin adherence and persistence have suggested that up to 34% of statin users discontinued therapy due to financial issues were the primary determinants. Novel modalities offer a great advantage in achieving lipid goals while enhancing adherence. Such modalities include monoclonal antibody agents such as proprotein convertase subtilisn/kexin type 9 or PCSK9. These agents offer a greater reduction in LDL levels, results show up to 50% reduction. Novel modalities are an emerging modality in the area of hyperlipidemia and needed in patients who cannot tolerate statin therapy. A review of these novel lipid modalities will be discussed.
Biography: Tony Eid is Assistant Professor of Clinical Sciences at California Health Sciences University. He received his PharmD from Loma Linda University School of Pharmacy. Dr. Eid’s research interest is on cardiovascular risk reduction. He has several publications, and received pharmaceutical grants on diabetes education. He is also a peer reviewer for American Journal of Health System Pharmacy.

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Session 4 – Advances in Primary Care

Patty Harvard, PharmD

Patty Harvard, PharmD

Professor of Clinical Sciences, CHSU College of Pharmacy

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Title: Interdisciplinary practice and research to improve quality of care and transform clinical translational research training in HIV and pregnancy.
Abstract: Approximately 71% of women with HIV/AIDS are between the reproductive age of 24 and 44 years. In the absence of antiretroviral therapy (ART), the risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1 is approximately 25%. The risk of vertical transmission has decreased to <1% with HIV testing, counseling, tripartite use of ART, mode of delivery, and discouragement from breast feeding. An interdisciplinary HIV High Risk Pregnancy Clinic (HHRPC) was implemented at The Ohio State University in July 2001 in collaboration with the Departments of Infectious Diseases, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Pediatrics and Pharmacy. Outcomes database was established to improve quality-of-care for HIV-infected pregnant women and babies, and establish a research platform for postgraduate training in clinical translational research. Between July 2001 and June 2006, there was a total of 150 referrals to the HHRPC (25% Caucasian, 75% African American, 2.1% Hispanic). The use of antepartum ART evolved from dual nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) to protease-inhibitor (PI) plus dual NRTIs combination for viral suppression. Undetectable viral load (VL) at delivery was achieved in 102 of122 (84%) women. Maternal ART-related adverse events included nevirapine (NVP) associated hepatotoxicity (n=3) and elevated liver enzymes (n = 2). Premature delivery was reported in 26 of 123 (21.3%) live births, and all infants were HIV-negative. A total of five interdisciplinary clinical translational research studies are pending or have been published. A similar interdisciplinary model in primary care will be developed to promote quality-of-care to the residents of Central California and scholarship for faculty and collaborators.
Biography: Dr. Havard was Assistant/Associate Professor at Rutgers University (1988-2003), the Ohio State University (1994-2006), and University at Buffalo (2006 – 2014). She served as Interim Associate Dean of Academic Affairs at UB between 10/2010 and 3/2013. Her future scholarship interests include 1) clinical efficacy and safety of curcumin in the treatment of aromatase-inhibitors-induced arthralgia in women with breast cancer; and, 2) characterization of drug-herb interactions of curcumin and HIV-protease inhibitors in HIV-infected patients, and 3) interprofessional education and intercollaborative practices to improve access and quality of care to the underserved population and enhance scholarship for faculty and collaborators.

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Session 4 – Advances in Primary Care

Jennifer West, PharmD, CGP

Jennifer West, PharmD, CGP

Assistant Professor of Clinical Sciences, CHSU College of Pharmacy

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Title: What pushed pharmacists to get SB 493 approved in California?
Abstract: Pharmacists have a long history of being an integral part of the health care profession. From going beyond medication dispensing, to helping manage medication use alongside physicians under protocol, pharmacists have always offered other healthcare services from behind the counter. With Obamacare in place, there is more opportunity for the pharmacist to expand their roles in managing patient’s medications. This session will provide background into other services a pharmacist currently can offer outside of dispensing, and how SB 493 expands the pharmacist’s scope of practice.
Biography: Jennifer West, PharmD, FASCP, CGP, is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Sciences, at California Health Sciences University (CHSU). She graduated with a PharmD from the University of California, San Francisco, and completed a Geriatric Fellowship at UCSF and Mt. Zion Hospitals. Her previous work includes: skilled nursing facility pharmacy consulting, staff and manager of community pharmacies, formulary management for an insurance company, adjudicating California’s Medi-Cal TARs, directing an inpatient psychiatric and respiratory hospital pharmacies. She is coordinating a Self-Care class at CHSU, serves as Curriculum Committee Chair and Admissions Committee member. Jennifer recently received a Certificate in Geriatric Pharmacy.

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Session 4 – Advances in Primary Care

Michael Freudiger, PharmD, BCPS, CGP

Michael Freudiger, PharmD, BCPS, CGP

Clinical Pharmacist, Saint Agnes Medical Center

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Title: A Review of Current Pharmacy Practice Models.
Abstract: SB 493 is opening up discussion on new and alternatives ways of practicing pharmacy. For many years, integrated health systems such as the Department of Veterans Affairs and Kaiser Permanente have operated with alternative models which include pharmacists in direct patient care. These extremely successful programs fully utilize the extensive knowledge of pharmacists in clinical monitoring and medication management. Data from the Department of Veterans Affairs shows a significant cost savings when pharmacists are used for management of chronic diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and anticoagulation. Other pharmacist based clinics for management of HIV, HCV, heart failure, psychiatry, pain management, rheumatoid arthritis, ESA monitoring, etc. have been recently implemented. These types of successful programs need to be examined when discussions of SB 493 implementation occur.
Biography: Michael Freudiger is a clinical pharmacist and USP 797 compliance supervisor at Saint Agnes Medical Center in Fresno, CA. He received his PharmD at University of the Pacific and completed a PGY-1 Pharmacy Practice Residency at the Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System in Loma Linda, CA. Michael’s interests include critical care, long term care, and oncology, and he has recently published a pharmacotherapy chapter in The Manual of Clinical Problems in Pulmonary Medicine 7th Edition. He is a Board Certified Pharmacotherapy Specialist (BCPS) and Certified Geriatric Pharmacist (CGP).

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Session 4 – Advances in Primary Care

Jennifer Hudspeth, PharmD, CGP

Jennifer Hudspeth, PharmD, CGP

Assistant Professor of Clinical Sciences, CHSU College of Pharmacy

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Title: The future of pharmacists: What’s on the horizon after SB 493?
Abstract: With SB 493 being signed into law, the California State Board of Pharmacy now has the task to decide how to implement the many changes this law provides. Currently, the State Board of Pharmacy is working in a joint effort with the California Medical Board to develop protocols for pharmacists to furnish hormonal contraceptives and nicotine replacement therapy. Of important consideration is how to implement the new Advanced Practice Pharmacist designation. The board is considering how other states have implemented similar programs and using this information to help develop a protocol for the State of California. SB 493 brings many new responsibilities to pharmacists. Of particular interest, this bill has named pharmacists ‘providers’ which may have a positive effect on pharmacy practice by improved payment for services. While full implementation will take time, the future of pharmacy is looking brighter for pharmacists.
Biography: Jennifer Hudspeth is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Sciences and Director of Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences at California Health Sciences University. She received her PharmD from Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. Jennifer has previously worked as pharmacy manager for Walgreens, Renal Pharmacist and Clinical Coordinator at Sierra View District Hospital. Her interests focus on End-Stage Renal Disease including dialysis, independent pharmacy practice, drug development, medication therapy management and complementary and alternative medicine. Jennifer has also received certification in geriatric pharmacy.

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Thursday
August 7, 2014



7:00 a.m. to 6:10 p.m.


At California Health Sciences University
College of Pharmacy

120 N. Clovis Ave.
Clovis, CA 93612